Traveling to us on a plane for the first time?

You’ve booked your intensive therapy week and you’re excited to book your trip, but if your child has mobility challenges, traveling on a plane might seem a little daunting.

We’re sharing tips and advice from other parents that can help make things run a little more smoothly.

Pick your spot as early as you can

If your child needs a Crelling harness for extra support, it’s best to contact the airline to ask about their policies as they can differ from one airline to another. Not every seat on the plane can be used with a Crelling harness, so booking your seat early will give you peace of mind that you have one which is going to be suitable.

child traveling on a plane looking out of the window


Medical equipment and medication

If you need to bring medical equipment, the majority of airlines let you bring it free of charge, but you do need to book it with them ahead of time.

They all have different policies around this but you’ll need a list of the equipment and supplies and possibly the size and weight of the items. It’s best to do this well ahead of your trip, as there can be some back and forth.

If you need to bring medications with you, bringing a letter from the GP or a copy of the prescription can be a good idea in case security have questions.

If your child needs a feeding tube, going through the security checks can be a pain if the staff aren’t used to seeing this kind of equipment. If you’re flying from the UK, PINNT charity offer medical tags to put on your feeding rucksack. If you’re stopped for a security check, you can ask them to scan the QR code which will verify that it’s genuine medical equipment and supplies (it will not show details of your child’s condition or treatment). The tags are free of charge, you simply need to apply to become a PINNT member (also free) and then apply for the tag.

Check out the PINNT website >

If your child uses a walking aid but doesn’t need it to get to the plane itself, you can check it in as oversized luggage.

If he or she needs their walking aid to get to the plane, it’s no problem, it will be collected and returned to the aircraft door, so it’s ready and waiting when you arrive. 


Ask for help if you need it

If your child isn’t a fan of crowds or if standing in a long security line will be an issue, speak to the security guards. They will often move you forward in the queue; they don’t want to have an upset child in line any more than you do! You can also ask for airport assistance in advance if you think you may need it – being driven in an electric cart to the gate can feel like a fun ride and make things a little easier.

The cabin crew are your friends. Speak to them before you board or once you’re seated and let them know if you have any particular requirements or if they can help in any way. Most cabin crews love children and are happy to help.


Make it fun

As with all things at Swim Lab International, our philosophy is that everything feels a lot easier when it’s fun!

Bring a goodie bag. Think sticker books, reading books, iPad, small games, and perhaps a new small toy that will have novelty value.

You can often take small juice cartons through security now for children, although it might be wise to check in advance with your local airport, and of course, we all love a little snack to help the time pass on the plane itself.


On arrival

You can pre-book a taxi transfer for your arrival on the island, so you know you have a cab ready and waiting. Lanzarote taxi have disability-adapted vehicles if you need one to get you to your villa or hotel.

Book your Lanzarote Taxi >

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